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Oxycodone Addiction


Oxycodone addiction can arise from sustained or improper use of this medication. Oxycodone is a Schedule II controlled substance in the United States. It is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine and used principally as a pain medication. Thebaine is a minor constituent of opium and related to morphine and codeine. Oxycodone was first developed in 1919 by Bayer as a less addictive pain medication than its heroin counterpart. However, the likelihood of developing an Oxycodone addiction is similar to that of developing a morphine addiction.

Oxycodone addiction can arise from sustained or improper use of this medication. Oxycodone is a Schedule II controlled substance in the United States. It is a semi-synthetic opioid derived from thebaine and used principally as a pain medication. Thebaine is a minor constituent of opium and related to morphine and codeine. Oxycodone was first developed in 1919 by Bayer as a less addictive pain medication than its heroin counterpart. However, the likelihood of developing an Oxycodone addiction is similar to that of developing a morphine addiction.

Oxycodone Addiction
Oxycodone Addiction


Usually, Oxycodone addiction is rare from patients using it to control their pain. This is due to the fact that stable blood levels of the drug occur after approximately 12 hours. Chronic administration, permitting blood levels to fluctuate, can lead to Oxycodone addiction. Therefore, levels must be monitored closely by a healthcare professional. Recreational use makes the user more susceptible to Oxycodone addiction because the plasma level never stabilizes and there is always a ‘rush’ upon dosing.

Side effects of Oxycodone are the same as those common to opioids: mainly nausea, constipation and drowsiness. Vomiting, itchy skin and dizziness are less common. Also, the intensity of these side effects tends to decrease over the course of time as tolerance develops. Oxycodone causes somewhat less side effects than morphine.


Activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway found in the brain is the cause of Oxycodone addiction rather than the diverse other effects such as alertness, euphoria, contentment or disinhibition producted by the drug.